What is MNET?

MNET is the Military Occupational Structure Identification Code (MOSID)/National Occupation Code (NOC) Equivalency Tool. It is a ‘Military to Civilian’ or ‘Civilian to Military’ job translator.

MNET data is based on the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) job-based specifications and Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) list of civilian occupations, known as the NOC catalogue.

MNET is available to the public at no cost and will be updated regularly by the respective governmental departments.

National Occupation Classification

The NOC 2016 is the official resource on job information in Canada. It provides a standard catalogue and framework used for dialogue on labour market information. The catalogue sorts more than 30,000 job titles into 500 Unit Groups, organized according to skill levels and skill types. All military jobs are cross-referenced against each NOC for the purpose of defining related civilian job fields.

Occupation 'Translation'

In most cases CAF MOSIDs have been directly translated into their civilian NOCs for the purpose of recruiting. Another purpose for occupation ‘translation’ is for defining related knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs). Some MOSIDs may have several NOCs associated with a military occupation. This reflects a variety of tasks and duties that a CAF member may perform or acquire within an occupation.

Military years of service will also define the level of leadership experience, time management, supervisory and organizational skills needed. These are other KSAs common to all military jobs and are directly translated to the civilian labour market.

How to Use MNET

In order to maximize a successful military to civilian career transition, it is recommended using MNET in conjunction with other resources including:

You may also sign up for ESDC's free Job Match tool to create a detailed job match profile based on your military KSAs. This will allow you and interested employers to connect through Employment for Veterans.

MNET should be used as a guide when trying to better understand the correlation between civilian and military occupations.

Version: 23.10.2017